Career Guide for People With Disabilities [Updated 2020]

April 3
33 min read

As a person with a disability, you may hesitate to look for work. You can be unsure whether or not to make a disability known when applying for employment. 

In today’s job market, however, that shouldn’t be an issue. A disability doesn’t prevent you from having the job of your dreams. The job market accommodates people with a wide range of qualifications, passions, talents, and abilities. 

Opportunities can be found in all fields: nursing, business, media, technology, law, social sciences – you name it. There are people with disabilities working in almost all industries. 

Read on to find everything you need to know about navigating the pathway to employment as an individual with a disability.

This guide is mainly for our US readers, but there’s useful advice for everyone else as well. 

In this guide you will find:

  • Job-Search 101 - All You Need to Know
  • Know Your Rights - All You Need to Know About ADA
  • 73+ Careers for People With Disabilities
  • Top 9 Job Sites for People With Disabilities
  • FAQ - Everything You Need to Know
  • Other Resources

Job-Search 101 - All You Need to Know 

Looking for a job as a person with a disability can feel intimidating. Don’t worry! We’re here to help you get a better grasp of the hiring process. 

These are the steps we’re going to cover in our job-search guide:

  1. How to find the right job
  2. Should you disclose your disability or not
  3. What to do during the interview
  4. Requesting reasonable accommodation 

How to Find the Right Job

The right job for you will depend on three main factors:

First, the type of disability you have. This shouldn’t mean limiting yourself or your possibilities. Instead, it provides you with insights into the jobs that will best open doors for you. For instance, if you suffer from ADHD, you will do well in careers that offer creativity and independence. 

Second, your qualifications and skills. Do you have time management abilities or analytical skills? Review your background, and focus on what you can do best. 

Third, your interests and passions. You need to figure out what career makes you happy. What do you see yourself doing in the future? What job makes sense for you to pursue? 

After figuring out what you want to do, start your job hunt.

When looking for a job, use all the channels at your disposal. This includes:

  • Personal contacts. Ask your friends working in the industries you want to get into whether their company is hiring for your role.
  • Jobs ads. You can find a ton of these on most job boards - Monster.com, Indeed, LinkedIn, etc.
  • Disability employment services. You can find a bunch of these here.

You can also find a bunch of job boards specifically made for people with disabilities, but we’ll cover those a bit down in the article.

Before we get there, though, you should have a general idea on how to do the job-search process right. You, know, the usuals: writing a great resume, matching it with a cover letter, and so on.

Check out some of our top guides if you want to learn more!

  1. How to write a resume
  2. Make sure your resume is ATS friendly.
  3. Use lots of power words in your resume.
  4. Write an awesome cover letter.
  5. Learn some useful tips on how to ace the job application process.

Should I Disclose My Disability?

The only scenario you’re obliged to disclose a disability in is when requesting accommodation. With that exception, there isn’t a definite answer on whether or not to disclose a disability. At the end of the day, you decide how much you’d like to share, when, and to who. 

Here are some considerations to keep in mind about disclosing a disability:

  • Getting reasonable accommodation will help you be successful in your position. You will no longer have a barrier preventing you from doing the job and advancing in it. At the same time, you will live authentically, and bring your whole self to work. 
  • Timing is important. If you need accommodation, you can choose to disclose your disability and request it after accepting the job offer. This doesn’t necessarily need to happen during the interview. However, it’s better to do it before there are work performance issues. The best timing would be within the first week of starting a new job. Have your health provider rundown what accommodations you need before you disclose them to your employer. 
  • A disability can change or advance. If these changes affect your work performance, it’s best to notify the relevant people. They will adjust the accommodation and create a comfortable workspace for you. 
  • You have the right to not share information about the disability. It isn’t mandatory to tell co-workers or other employees about your accommodation or disability. As for your employer, he is obligated to keep the information confidential. 

During the Interview 

Job interviews are tense and nerve-wracking for many people. If you have a disability, the tension often climbs up even more. Although you might be just as qualified and skilled as any other candidate, the fear an employer might not recognize your potential can be discouraging. 

The good news is, with some prior preparation, your potential employer will notice you for you, and not your disability. 

Demonstrate Confidence During the Interview

The first step is demonstrating confidence. This is one of the most important elements of an interview, especially when you have a disability. If you struggle showing confidence naturally, that’s okay. Everyone feels nervous at times, especially about an important interview. 

However, ensure you enter the interview with as much assurance as possible. A strong handshake and relaxed presence can really appeal to the interviewer. 

Don’t underestimate the power of a professional and well-fitted outfit either. Make sure to dress professionally, with clothes that flatter you. It can go a long way in creating a proper impression. 

To boost true, authentic confidence you should enter the interview fully prepared. 

We already mentioned how important it is to find out as much as possible about the company. It’s also helpful to study commonly asked interview questions, like:

  • Tell me something about yourself.
  • How did you hear about this position?
  • Why did you decide to apply for this position?
  • What are your biggest strengths?
  • Why should we hire you?

Want to make sure that you ace that interview?

Prepare answers and practice with a friend through a mock interview so nothing takes you by surprise.

Talking About Your Disability During the Interview

Now that you’re ready and feeling confident, let’s concentrate on your disability. 

Just like we mentioned before, disclosing your disability is a matter of personal choice. During an interview, however, non-disclosure may not be possible in certain situations:

For example, if you are deaf, you may need to request an interpreter for the interview. Or if you’re in a wheelchair, you may need to notify the employer beforehand to ensure they have the right accommodation (wheelchair ramps). 

In short, there are circumstances in which you are obligated to disclose the disability so that the interview accommodates you. 

Having said that, it’s left to your judgment to do whatever feels more comfortable. If you do decide to talk about it, it’s at your discretion how much you declare. 

Whatever you do, avoid connecting a disability with a weakness. 

For example, let’s say, the interviewer asks about your greatest flaw. If you have a hearing impairment, avoid answers such as “I have trouble communicating with clients on the phone if they speak in a low voice”. You don’t want your disability to be a job-related weakness.

A good, alternative weakness could be something unrelated to your disability. For example: “I tend to get nervous when I have to give a public speech to a large group of people.”

The interviewer, on the other hand, doesn’t have the right to ask about your disability. 

If you decide to open up about the disability, remember that your rights remain the same as any other candidate. Your interview is not allowed to stop cold or involve discriminating questions. 

How to Request Reasonable Accommodation

Every company has a different procedure for requesting accommodation. The information is usually given by the Human Resources Department, or in the employee handbook. You can choose to speak to your supervisor or administrator about requesting accommodation as well. 

Usually, you only have to let the employer know of work-related issues and the medical condition. You can do it through face-to-face communication, or submit the request in writing. It’s more convenient to have it in writing, in case there’s an argument on whether or not the request happened. There are accommodation request forms you can fill out. 

Be specific about the accommodation you need and why it will help you in doing the job. Provide medical records from your health care professional along with the request. 

Example of an accommodation request form:

Name: Steven J Creekmore 

Date: 14th of January 2020

Email: steven1987@gmail.com

Position: Finance Manager

Department: Accounting

Supervisor/Department Head: Brenda C Harden

  • 1) Please identify and describe the nature of the disability that limits your ability to do the job. 

My disability is amputation of the leg due to a physical injury. I use a wheelchair in order to maintain mobility and functionality.

  • 2) Describe the accommodation(s) that you are requesting. 

I am requesting a raised or height-adjustable desk. 

  • 3) Describe how the requested reasonable accommodation will facilitate you to carry out the job. 

The standard seated desk I currently have in my office makes it hard for me to work on. A height-adjustable desk will help me adjust the space requirements of the wheelchair. I will no longer struggle with reaching and working on the desk. 

Know Your Rights - All You Need to Know About ADA

ADA or Americans with Disability Act makes it unlawful to discriminate against a qualified individual with a disability.

Read on to learn everything you need to know about ADA and your rights. 

Are You Protected by The ADA?

ADA protects you if you are:

  • An employee with a disability. ADA’s definition of a disability is a physical or mental impairment that restricts any specific major life activity. Major life activity includes basic everyday tasks (walking, reading, communicating) and bodily functions (immune system, digestive, reproductive). 
  • An employee with a history of disability. No employer can discriminate against a worker based on a past impairment. 
  • An employee who the employer considers as disabled. Whether or not the employee is disabled, ADA still protects them from discrimination. 

Can an Employer Ask for Medical Examinations or About the Disability?

As previously mentioned, no. An employer can’t ask if you’re disabled, or for any other details. ADA protects your privacy rights. 

The only situation where the employer has the right to ask is if your disability completely stops you from performing well at the job, with or without reasonable accommodation.

Reasonable Accommodation

Reasonable Accommodation is a change made to the work environment to accommodate a person with a disability. It helps you perform and progress in the job.

You can ask for it at any time, during the hiring process or when they are employed. Generally, you should request this accommodation when there is an obstacle in the workplace, due to a disability that prevents you from doing the job. 

Some examples of reasonable accommodation may be:

  • Providing or adjusting equipment
  • Flexible work schedule (part-time or time off work)
  • Accessible and usable environment for people with disabilities
  • Assignment to an unoccupied environment

Keep in mind that reasonable accommodation is a legal obligation. 

There is, however, one rare exception in which the employer doesn’t have to provide a reasonable accommodation: 

If the accommodation is a undue hardship, which means costly or difficult to provide, the employer is not required by law to provide it. An employer should have objective evidence that providing reasonable accommodation is unreasonable, unjustified, excessive, improper, or extreme.

What Do I Do If I Am Being Discriminated Against? 

Disability discrimination happens when your employer treats you (a qualified individual with a disability or previous disability) unfairly or less favorably. 

If you think an employer is discriminating against you, you can file charges on the basis of disability by contacting the EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) office. The charge should be filed within 180 days of the discrimination. 

Remedies include: getting hired, promoted, back pay, reassignment, and reasonable accommodation. 

73+ Careers for People With Disabilities

No matter the disability, you have the opportunity to discover and explore a wide range of career paths. In fact, 20 million people of the working population in America have at least one impairment. 

Organizations are actively creating jobs for people with disabilities. Many industries support and welcome people with physical or mental challenges. 

Use our list of careers as a starting point. We have categorized the careers based on skill and type of disability. Here’s what you will find: 

  • 19+ Jobs for People with a Physical Disability
  • 7+ Jobs for People with Mental Illness 
  • 7+ Jobs for People with Learning Disabilities
  • 6+ Jobs for People with ADHD/ADD
  • 7+ Jobs for People with Speech Impairments
  • 6+ Jobs for People with Intellectual Disabilities
  • 7+ Jobs for Deaf and Hearing Impaired People
  • 7+ Jobs for Blind and Visually Impaired People
  • 7+ Jobs for People with Anxiety Disorders 

19+ Jobs for People with a Physical Disability

Creative & Artistic Jobs

  • Graphic Designer

What they do: Graphic Designers use computer software to create different visual concepts. Their goal is to inspire and captivate clients through the design. 

Where they work: Generally, they work in studios, where they have access to all the software. If they are entrepreneurs, they work from home. 

Working hours: The majority of Graphic Designers are self-employed, which creates the opportunity for flexible working hours.

Annual salary: $55,000 - $83,250

Degree: B.A in Graphic Design or a related field.

  • Computer Animation

What they do: Animators create the figures that come to life on screen. Their work is featured in all kinds of media: feature films, commercials, websites, computer games, etc.

Where they work: They work in well-lit offices or studios. 

Working hours: They have normal office hours, ranging from 35 to 40 a week. 

Annual Salary: 9,000 - $26,000

Degree: B.A in Animation, Fine Arts or a related field.

  • Video Editor

What they do: Video editors edit and bring together raw materials like video and sound, into a final product. They usually have a sharp eye in working with creative digital design. 

Where they work: Editing booths, studios or offices, motion picture industries. Many video editors are freelancers, so they work from home. 

Working hours: Working hours go up to about 40 a week. 

Annual Salary: $34,440 - $39,740

Degree: B.A in film editing or a related field.

  • Playwright

What they do: Playwrights have a passion for writing. They create, write and edit plays for theatres. They sometimes choose to get involved with the production of the play too. This includes script changes, promotion of the play, and even acting. 

Where they work: Most playwrights work from home. Any place the writer finds motivating and peaceful. 

Working hours: Flexible, depending on how much time the writer needs. 

Annual Salary: $38,000

Degree: No formal academic qualifications. Courses in drama/writing can be helpful. 

  • Interior Designers

What they do: Interior designers create indoor spaces that are practical, secure and beautiful. They pick the necessary and decorative objects and determine the space requirements. 

Working hours: Average of 39 hours a week. 

Where they work: Specialized design services. 

Annual Salary: $53,370

Degree: B.A in Interior Design 

Analytical Thinking & Mathematics

  • Computer Programmer

What they do: Computer programmers write code in a variety of computer languages such as C++, Java. They create, update and expand software programs. 

Where they work: Usually in an office, in the computer systems design. 

Working hours: Working hours can go up to 50 a week.

Annual Salary: $74,280 

Degree: B.A in computer science or a related field. Programmers can also be specified in different programming languages.

  • Office accountant

What they do: Accountants research and analyze accounting data. They prepare reports as well as provide financial advice for the clients. 

Where they work: They either work in offices or from home if they’re self-employed. 

Working hours: On average, they work 44 hours per week. 

Annual Salary: $55,061

Degree: B.A in Accounting

  • Insurance Underwriter

What they do: Insurance underwriters work in multiple categories of insurance, like health, life, property. They review insurance applications, evaluate risks and decide whether or not to offer coverage. 

Where they work: In indoor offices. 

Working hours: Underwriters usually work 40 hour weeks, full time. 

Annual Salary: $69,380

Degree: Bachelor in Finance, Business, Economics, Math or any related subject. 

  • Data entry operator

What they do: Data entry operators collect and enter data in databases. They uphold accurate records of important company information. 

Where they work: An office with a computer.

Working hours: Normal office hours, around 40 a week. 

Annual Salary: $41,912

Degree: The minimal requirement for a career in data entry is a high-school diploma. Courses in typing or keyboarding can be favorable. 

  • Business analyst

What they do: Business analysts conduct detailed market analysis. They identify the issues, and opportunities of a business, as well as provide solutions. 

Where they work: Office environment. 

Working hours: Normal working hours, 40-50 per week. 

Annual Salary: $94,881

Degree: Bachelor’s degree in any of the fields: Business Administration, Management, Information Technology. 

Communication Skills & Sales

  • Marketing specialist

What they do: Marketing specialists analyze the market and trends. They provide advice on how the company can meet the target market. They can also help with the organization of events such as conferences or trade shows. 

Where they work: Office environment. 

Working hours: 37 hours a week

Annual Salary: $49,526

Degree: Bachelor’s degree in marketing, business, communications, or a related field. 

  • Call Center worker

What they do: Call center workers mainly answer calls from clients and respond to emails. They sell products over the phone and place the orders in the computer system. 

Where they work: Call centers with an open workspace. 

Working hours: Average of 40 hours a week if you’re working full time. 

Annual Salary: $25,000

Degree: You can work as an entry-level employee with a High School diploma. 

  • HR specialist

What they do: HR specialists deal with the recruitment and placement of employees. They conduct interviews, background checks, and orientations. 

Where they work: They mainly work in offices. Some HR specialists travel to job fairs or college campuses to see the applicants. 

Working hours: They work around 40 hours per week.

Annual Salary: $62,590

Degree: A bachelor’s degree in human resources, business management, or a related field.

  • Brand manager

What they do: The brand manager’s duty is to create a strong impact on customers and to increase sales and market share of goods. He analyses market trends and monitors advertising and marketing activities.

Where they work: An office, in the marketing department. 

Working hours: 9 am to 5 pm, around 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: 40,000

Degree: A bachelor's degree in a relevant major and some years of prior marketing experience. 

  • Media planner

What they do: Media planners deal with creating media plans, conducting relevant research and analyzing data. 

Where they work: Advertising or Media Company offices. 

Working hours: The standard 40 hours a week.

Annual Salary: Between $48,820 and $64,048.

Degree: Bachelor in journalism, psychology, business, media communications, marketing or management. 

Research & Writing

  • Operations research analyst

What they do: Operations research analysts use advanced analytics and mathematics to recognize and resolve issues. They achieve this through analyses of complex tasks and obstacles. 

Where they work: Most of the time is spent in the office. Some analysts choose to conduct real-life observations in the field. 

Working hours: The standard 40 hours a week.

Annual Salary: $72,100

Degree: Bachelor in engineering, computer science, mathematics or a related field. Some organizations require a master’s degree for this position. 

  • Copy editor

What they do: Copy editors edit with the editing process of a piece of writing. They fix grammatical, punctuation and spelling errors. They sometimes add headers, headlines, photos to the writing. 

Where they work: office buildings

Working hours: The standard 40 hours a week.

Annual Salary: $58,870

Degree: No formal training is required. However, employees prefer you have a bachelor in Journalism, English or Communications. 

  • Technical writer 

What they do: Technical writers have the duty to simplify complex and technical information. They prepare “how-to” manuals with clear instructions, “frequently asked questions” sections, etc. 

Where they work: They mostly work in offices. Sometimes they work with engineers or other technology experts. 

Working hours: 40 hours per week, but they may be expected to work on the weekends. 

Annual Salary: $70,930

Degree: Bachelor in Web Design, Engineering or a related field.

  • Research assistant

What they do: Research assistants support professionals who are conducting research or analyzing data. Main duties include collecting and logging data, preparing graphs and spreadsheets, proofreading and editing documents. 

Where they work: Laboratories or offices, depending on the research 

Working hours: 20 to 29 hours a week 

Annual Salary: $46,640

Degree: Undergraduate or graduate students, with at least a Bachelors’s degree.  

7+ Jobs for People with Mental Illness

Cosmetology Jobs

If you are passionate about the beauty world, these jobs are for you. 

  • Hairstylist

What they do: Hairstylists are beauty service specialists who are trained in the fashion and styling of hair. This job is perfect for creative people with a good eye for design. 

Where they work: Hair or beauty salon 

Working hours: They are flexible if you’re self-employed. Usually 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $20,188

Degree: Associate's degree in cosmetology 

  • Nail technician 

What they do: Nail technicians provide nail services for their clients. 

Where they work: Nail salon

Working hours: 28-32 hours per week.

Annual Salary: $24,330

Degree: Nail training program 

Healthcare Jobs

  • Dental Hygienist

What they do: Dental Hygienists deal with patient’s oral hygiene. They do patient screening, clean teeth and provide advice regarding dental health. 

Where they work: Private dental offices, hospitals, nursing homes, community health settings, state facilities. 

Working hours: Around 32 hours a week.

Annual Salary: $73,440

Degree: Associate's degree in dental hygiene

  • Physical Therapy Assistant

What they do: Physical Therapy Assistants work under the supervision of a physical therapist. They usually chart patients and observe them during the treatment. 

Where they work: Offices of the physical therapist. They can work in hospitals, home care, nursing facilities, or for the government. 

Working hours: Around hours a week, weekends off. 

Annual Salary: $52,160

Degree: Associate's degree in Physical Therapy 

Other Jobs

  • Welding

What they do: Welders use heat to put together multiple metal components to form a final product. It’s important to have the physical strength to manage the welding equipment. 

Where they work: Building or construction companies.

Working hours: Overtime is common for welders. Work can go up to 70 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $41,380

Degree: Postsecondary training 

  • Photographer

What they do: Photographers are artists who take pictures of anything, from people and places to landscapes and events. 

Where they work: Wherever they need to take photographs. 

Working hours: Generally, 40 hours a week.

Annual Salary: $32,068 

Degree: No degree is required. Training can be helpful 

  • Veterinary assistant

What they do: If you have a love for animals, this job is just for you. Veterinary assistants deal with feeding, exercising, grooming animals and preparing them for surgery. 

Where they work: Clinics or hospitals in a safe, sanitary environment.

Working hours: 25 to 40 hours a week.

Annual Salary: $31,659

Degree: Certificate or Associate’s degree

7+ Jobs for People with Learning Disabilities 

  • Mental Health Counselor 

What they do: The main skill you need to have for this job is high emotional intelligence. Mental Health Counselors offer guidance to people, couples, families who are dealing with issues. Their main goal is to improve the mental health of the patient. 

Where they work: Private practices, treatment centers, prisons, schools, hospitals. 

Working hours: 40 hours a week

Annual Salary: $45,630

Degree: Undergraduate in Psychology, Sociology, Counseling or a related field

  • Waiter/Server

What they do: Waiters are men and women who take orders and serve in restaurants, bars. To be a good waiter you need to have verbal communication, customer service skills. 

Where they work: Restaurants, bars

Working hours: Irregular hours, no more than 40 a week

Annual Salary: $34,468

Degree: No formal requirements. Employers prefer a High School diploma, on-the-job training. 

  • Truck driver

What they do: Truck drivers transport goods or materials on a location, within a deadline. The main skill required is driving knowledge. 

Where they work: Trucks

Working hours: 70-hour minimum a week 

Annual Salary: $43,680

Degree: A high school diploma and truck driver training courses.

  • Housekeeper

What they do: Housekeepers clean houses, buy or cook meals, do the laundry. To be a housekeeper you need to have experience in house and child care, cooking, cleaning.

Where they work: Different houses.

Working hours: Average of 40 hours a week

Annual Salary: $22,619

Degree: No degree required.  

  • Receptionist 

What they do: Receptionists are responsible for administrative tasks such as answering and taking calls, scheduling appointments, greeting clients, etc. 

Where they work: Usually a front desk of a lobby at their workplace. 

Working hours: Typical work week is 40 hours. 

Annual Salary: $29,640

Degree: A high school diploma and good communication skills. 

  • Event Planner

What they do: Event planners deal with structuring and coordinating an event. They are responsible for people to have a good time at the event. An event planner needs the right mix of coordination and interpersonal skills. 

Where they work: In and out of offices, venues or event sites. 

Working hours: 40 hours a week. Weekend hours are common before a big event.

Annual Salary: $49,370

Degree: B.A in Hospitality or any related field

  • Flight attendants

What they do: A flight attendant’s main duty is the safety of the passenger. They should make the passenger comfortable and serve snacks or meals.

Where they work: Airplanes and airports.

Working hours: Irregular hours. The monthly average is 65-90 on-air, and 50 preparing the planes for passengers. 

Annual Salary: $50,500

Degree: High school diploma, flight attendant training. 

6+ Jobs for People with ADHD / ADD

  • Teacher

What they do: If helping other people helps you focus, give teaching a try. A teacher’s job is to instruct students in different school subjects. 

Where they work: School environments

Working hours: 40 hours a week

Annual Salary: $55,790

Degree: Bachelor from a university, 2 years of experience. 

  • Cashier

What they do: Cashiers generally have one simple duty. They process the payments of the client for goods and services. 

Where they work: Behind checkout stands.

Working hours: Irregular hours, 40 a week. 

Annual Salary: $21,803

Degree: Not required. 

  • Police officer

What they do: Being a police officer gives you the chance to rely on your own skills and judgment. The main duty of the job is to protect people and property. 

Where they work: Depends on the job position. In the field, station, evidence room or another department. 

Working hours: Irregular hours, night shifts and weekends. 40 hours a week or more

Annual Salary: $53,540 

Degree: Some agencies require a high school degree only. Generally, you need a bachelor in Criminal Law or a related field. 

  • Nurse 

What they do: Nurses have a challenging job that holds your attention. It is a high energy position with variety and a good patient-staff report. The main responsibility is to care for patients by providing health care. 

Where they work: Hospitals. 

Working hours: Irregular hours, weekends and holidays. Average of 40 hours a week.

Annual Salary: $71,730

Degree: B.S in nursing, or an associate’s degree in nursing. 

  • Sound Technician

What they do: This position offers creativity and the ability to work with a team. Sound technicians record and reproduce sounds through audio equipment. 

Where they work: Film, tv broadcast, or radios in a studio. 

Working hours: 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $52,390

Degree: Degree in production, audio engineering or a related field. 

  • Warehouse worker

What they do: To be a warehouse worker you need good physical strength. A warehouse worker packs and ships orders, receive the stock, manages the warehouse, etc. 

Where they work: Warehouse.

Working hours: The average 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $31,000

Degree: No education. On-the-job training only. 

7+ Jobs for People with Speech Impairments

  • Landscaping

What they do: Landscapers deal with groundskeeping and maintenance duties. They work in outdoor environments, with a limited need to talk. 

Where they work: Gardens, lawns

Working hours: Average of 40 hours.

Annual Salary: $26,601

Degree: A high school diploma. 

  • Food preparation

What they do: Food preparators make food and meals under the supervision of a cook or chef. 

Where they work: Kitchens

Working hours: 40 hours

Annual Salary: $22,920

Degree: No education needed

  • Journalists

What they do: Journalists deliver news and events to the public. Their main job is to analyze and edit information, which doesn’t require a lot of speech. 

Where they work: Offices.

Working hours: Average of 39 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $55,530

Degree: Bachelor in Journalism, Communication or a related field. 

  • Market Researcher

What they do: Researchers collect information about the market and analyze it. 

Where they work: Office with a computer.

Working hours: 40 hours a week, tight schedule. 

Annual Salary: $63,230

Degree: Bachelor in market research or a related field. 

  • Mathematician

What they do: A mathematician’s main job is to use advanced mathematics to solve real-life problems.  

Where they work: Comfortable offices. 

Working hours: 40 hours a week, sometimes overtime. 

Annual Salary: $84,760. 

Degree: You usually need a master’s in Mathematics, but some companies hire candidates with a bachelor’s degree only.  

  • Bookkeeper

What they do: Bookkeepers deal with managing a company’s expenditures and financial activities. 

Where they work: Offices. 

Working hours: Standard 40 hours. 

Annual Salary: $52,500 

Degree: High school diploma, as well as math and computer skills. 

  • Financial Analyst

What they do: Analysts have an intellectually challenging job. They analyze financial trends and provide financial guidance for a company. 

Where they work: Offices in financial institutions. 

Working hours: Long hours that go around 50-70 a week. 

Annual Salary: $64,000 - $96,000

Degree: Bachelor in accounting, business administration, finance or a related field. 

6+ Jobs for People with Intellectual Disabilities 

  • Line cook

What they do: A line cook is responsible for preparing meals, usually within the hospital industry.

Where they work: Indoors in a kitchen. 

Working hours: Variable hours, depending on the restaurant. 

Annual Salary: $23,410

Degree: No formal education required. Skills and expertise in cooking required. 

  • Pet sitter

What they do: Pet sitters are liable for all basic animal care when their clients are on holiday or on business trips.

Where they work: Clients home

Working hours: Whenever their clients need help.

Annual Salary: $23,760

Degree: No formal education.

  • Fitness trainer 

What they do: Fitness coaches and instructors guide, teach and encourage people or groups to exercise. 

Where they work: Usually in a gym, fitness center. 

Working hours: About 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $39,210

Degree: Minimally a high school degree. 

  • Parking Lot Attendant

What they do: To be a parking lot attendant you need the ability to manage a range of vehicles and great driving skills. 

Where they work: Parking lots. 

Working hours: 37 to 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: 6,820

Degree: A driver’s license. 

  • Sales Associate 

What they do: Sales associates sell goods or services while also delivering excellent service.

Where they work: Stores. 

Working hours: 20 to 30 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $24,200

Degree: High school diploma. However, if you have a degree (business or related field) is more favorable. 

  • Office Assistant 

What they do: For the most part, assistants deal with coordinating the employer’s day. The schedule appointments take messages sent emails. It’s a straightforward, fairly easy office job.

Where they work: Offices

Working hours: 30 to 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $36,630

Degree: A high school diploma and some basic office skills.

7+ Jobs for the Deaf and Hearing Impaired 

  • Archivist 

What they do: Archivists are responsible for managing documents that are highly valuable. This job is great for detail-oriented, organized and concentrated individuals. 

Where they work: Library or university.

Annual Salary: $41,899

Degree: Master’s degree is usually required.

  • Audiologist

What they do: On audiologist is a trained professional who treats hearing loss problems. Part of the job includes lip-reading and sign language training. These tasks are perfect for people with hearing impairments because they already have experience and knowledge. 

Where they work: Healthcare facilities

Working hours: Full-time, 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $82,877

Degree: Doctoral degree. 

  • Social Media Manager 

What they do: Social Media Manager is responsible for building a brand and promoting it. Main skills include writing, strategic thinking, and creativity. 

Where they work: Office environments. 

Working hours: 40 hours, full time. Overtime and longer weekdays are common. 

Annual Salary: $60,000

Degree: Degree in marketing or a related area 

  • Computer Programmer

What they do: Computer programmers write code in a variety of computer languages such as C++, Java. They create, update and expand software programs. 

Where they work: Usually in an office, in the computer systems design. 

Working hours: Working hours can go up to 50 a week.

Annual Salary: $74,280 

Degree: B.A in computer science or a related field. Programmers can also be specified in different programming languages. 

  • Beautician 

What they do: A beautician provides nail, skin, and hair care services to customers.

Where they work: A beauty salon. 

Working hours: 9 am to 5 pm, including Saturdays. Around 48 hours a week.

Annual Salary: $21,760

Degree: Training in personal care services, a license.

  • Astronomer

What they do: If you find astrology fascinating, this job is for you. Astronomers apply their knowledge on mathematics and physics, to discover more about the universe. The test theories, analyze data and present their findings. 

Where they work: National observatories and government-funded labs.

Working hours: More than 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: 05,680

Degree: A bachelor's degree in Astrology or a related field. 

  • Civil Engineer

What they do: Civil engineers build, develop and preserve the environment we live in. They prepare, construct and oversee the maintenance of the various building structures. 

Where they work: Indoors in offices

Working hours: Around 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $86,640

Degree: Degree in civil engineering or a related field. 

7+ Jobs for the Blind and Visually Impaired

  • Radio personality 

What they do: Being a radio personality or a talk show host is an easily accessible, awesome way to make a living. It’s also an alternative for the visually impaired to be themselves, without having to display the disability at all. If you have interesting stories and a good voice, give this position a try. 

Where they work: Studio, radio station. 

Working hours: More than 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $31,400

Degree: Not necessary. A degree in Journalism or Communications can help. 

  • Music Teacher

What they do: Music is an art that can be a form of expression for the visually impaired. Music teachers educate students on how to sing, play musical instruments, learn musical theory, or a mix of these jobs. 

Where they work: Classroom, auditorium, music store. Those who provide private lessons usually teach from home. 

Working hours: An average of 25 hours. 

Annual Salary: 06,933

Degree: A bachelor's degree in music education. 

  • Speech-language pathologist

What they do: Speech-language pathologists help treat communication disorders. 

You may have experienced some complex challenges of communicating with a disability in your own life. Through this job, you can use some of the abilities you've gained, to help others with speech difficulties. 

Where they work: Healthcare facilities. 

Working hours: 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $80,000

Degree: Master’s degree 

  • Financial Advisor

What they do: Financial advisors help their clients plan and manage their finances. For this job, you need to have strong people skills, and the ability to analyze trends. 

Where they work: Offices. 

Working hours: Around 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $88,890

Degree: Bachelor's degree in economics, finance or a related field. 

  • Telemarketer

What they do: Telemarketers are salespeople and advertisers who do business exclusively by phone.

Where they work: Special telephone room 

Working hours: 40 hours or less a week. 

Annual Salary: $23,839

Degree: On-the-job training

  • Online Tutor

What they do: If you prefer to work from home, the internet makes it easily accessible and efficient for you. Online tutors offer students of all ages learning support, usually through a web-cam.

Where they work: Home or any other preferable place. 

Working hours: From 5 to 29 hours a week, as many as the person schedules. 

Annual Salary: $43,914

Degree: Minimally a high school diploma. You could need a teaching license, depending on the job. 

  • Social worker

What they do: Social workers help people deal with and overcome the problems of their daily lives. Your disability can teach you much about navigating the social services world. You can use your experience to help others overcome their challenges. 

Where they work: Hospitals, nursing homes, schools, child welfare facilities, etc. 

Working hours: Between 35 to 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $47,980

Degree: Bachelor’s degree in social work. 

7+ Jobs for People with Anxiety Disorders 

  • Animal caretaker

What they do: Animal caretakers tend to the everyday needs of animals. If you live with a social anxiety disorder, interacting with animals can be appealing. It's a great way to make a profit while reducing contact with people. 

Where they work: Zoos, pet shops, animal shelters, etc. 

Working hours: 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $8.39 per hour, $22,527 a year 

Degree: High school 

  • Pharmacy Technician

What they do: The responsibilities of the pharmacy technician include counting pills, measuring medicines, and providing instructions to customers.

Where they work: Pharmacies 

Working hours: 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $32,700.

Degree: High school diploma and on-the-job training. 

  • Massage therapist 

What they do: Massage therapists perform therapeutic massages of soft tissues and joints. While they are viewed as people who reduce the stress of others, massage therapists themselves can feel less anxiety by massaging others. 

Where they work: Spas, hospitals, fitness centers. 

Working hours: 15 to 30 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $39,900

Degree: Certificate or associate’s degree in massage therapy. 

  • Plumber

What they do: Being a plumber is a physically demanding job. Plumbers install or repair pipelines, and carry waste away from buildings, factories. 

Where they work: Homes, office building, factories. 

Working hours: 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $53,910

Degree: License and Apprentice 

  • Electrical Engineering 

What they do: Electrical engineers design, develop and maintain electrical control systems and components.

Where they work: Labs, offices. 

Working hours: 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $91,810

Degree: A degree in electrical engineering, physics, mechanical engineering or a related field. 

  • Librarian 

What they do: Librarians help people find material and conduct research in libraries. This job is perfect for people with anxiety because the environment is generally quiet. Human interaction is also very limited. 

Where they work: Libraries in schools, universities, local government. 

Working hours: 40 hours a week. 

Annual Salary: $58,520 

Degree: Master’s degree in library science

  • Photographer

What they do: Photographers are artists who take pictures of anything, from people and places to landscapes and events. 

Where they work: Wherever they need to take photographs. 

Working hours: Generally, 40 hours a week.

Annual Salary: $32,068 

Degree: No degree is required. Training can be helpful.

Top 9 Job Sites for People With Disabilities

Not sure where to start your job hunt? Check out these sites:

In Ability Jobs, you can seek employment by posting your resume or simply by searching for a job. The site guarantees you will be judged solely on your skills and qualifications. The process is straight-forward, easy and free. All you have to do is create an account and upload your resume. You also have the option to add a job alert for the profession or browse open positions. 

This site does not require you to create an account, although it is free if you want to do so. Disability Job Exchange provides a search tool by keyword and location which helps you look for relevant jobs. The site also offers lots of tips and advice on job-hunting.

Ability Links is targeted at people with disabilities aged 7 to 64 and the families of the disabled. The site’s mission is to provide a “disability employment community”. In the site, you can find a job board, resume bank, online job fairs, and more.

Disabled Person is well-organized, efficient and simple to use. In Disabled Person, you can apply to work for a company that is committed to hiring people with disabilities. You can search by category, state, city. There are also plenty of reliable articles to help people with disabilities nail their job-search. 

Getting Hired is similar to Ability Jobs. It’s easy to use, neat, and useful. It features job board options like keyword search, industry, and company categories. The home page has a special feature where you can check out currently trending jobs. To navigate, you need to create an account. 

This site focuses on helping the disabled claim their benefits while also job searching for that perfect position. Land a Job also offers counselors, online courses on employment, all for free. 

In Recruit Disability you can search for a job by keyword and location. To access the full features, you need to create an account. These include job alerts, a resume building tool, a salary comparison tool and more. 

USA Jobs is not exclusively made for the disabled, but it does have a section dedicated to them. This site mainly posts government jobs, which might be more difficult to get but provide more benefits. 

EOP is a diverse site with an online job board as well as Career Expos for women, minority groups and people with disabilities.

FAQ - Everything You Need to Know 

In this section, we’re going to answer all other common questions that we haven’t already covered in the article. 

  • What can I do if the employer doesn’t let me bring my service animal to work?

Your employer has the right to refuse you a service animal only if it’s causing the business to suffer. Your animal needs to be properly trained and not disrupt the workplace. 

Keep in mind, though, that an emotional support animal is not the same as a service animal.

Emotional support animals are not considered a necessity under the ADA. So, If you need an emotional support animal, the employer can refuse your request. 

With those exceptions, the employer not allowing you to bring a service animal is an ADA issue. 

What you CAN do in that case is talk to Human Resources or a supervisor about the issue. They are obligated to provide you with reasonable accommodation, and that includes your service animal. If they still provide no assistance, seek out to an employment lawyer. 

  • What can I do if my employer talked to someone in the company about my disability without my permission?

The first step you can take is to raise the issue within the company. If the problem gets solved within the company, it saves you the trouble and money of making a legal claim. 

Follow the complaint policies and report the issue. If there isn’t a complaint policy, talk to the HR Department or personnel office. 

Remember to always put your complaint in writing, so that you have a record of it in the future. 

If the company fails to address the complaint, you can decide to sue. You can file a discrimination charge with the EEOC, or with the state’s fair employment agency. If the agency or EEOC doesn’t resolve the issue either, you can file a lawsuit. 

  • Can my employer refuse to pay medical insurance coverage for my disability?

The employer is required to give you equal access to whatever health insurance is offered to other employees. He cannot charge you an additional cost or restrict you from receiving health insurance. However, this offered coverage may or may not cover the medical needs of your disability.  

  • Are substance abuse and alcoholism considered disabilities?

No, substance abuse and alcoholism are not protected by the ADA. Further, an employer has the right to drug-test you for illegal use. Under the ADA, the testing isn’t considered a medical violation.

Other Resources

Conclusion

The job-hunting process is scary, especially when you have a disability.

Hopefully, our article answered most of your questions and cleared up some common misconceptions and confusion.

The only thing left to do is put your best foot forward and getting started with your job-search!

If you need more career advice, don’t forget to check out some of our recommended readings: