Customer Service Resume [2021] - Examples & Guide

23 July
8 min read

You’re a customer service representative.

You keep customers satisfied by providing solutions to their concerns.

But now it’s time to ease your future employer’s concerns by providing a resume that shows your value as a customer service employee.

This involves highlighting your most notable skills and experiences.

Not sure how to do this?

Well, just follow the simple steps in this guide.

Specifically, we will cover:

  • An example of a finished customer service resume that works
  • How to write a customer service resume that’ll fill up your interview diary
  • How to make a customer service resume stand out [with top tips & tricks]

Before we get into the details, here’s a customer service resume example, created with our very own resume builder:

customer service resume

Looks great, right?! Follow the steps below to create a resume that’ll have employers in a frenzy to hire you.

How to Format a Customer Service Resume

Before you can serve the hiring manager, you need to organize your work station!

But what do we mean by this?

Well, just like your work station, your resume needs to be arranged in a way that doesn’t lead to confusion and delays.

Choosing the correct resume format allows the hiring manager to instantly see your most notable achievements, instead of having to hunt for them. 

The most common resume format is “reverse-chronological”, and it is one that we always recommend to customer service representatives. 

The following two resume formats also get our approval…

  • Functional Resume – If you’ve got the natural talent to help customers, but lack the hands-on experience, this resume format is recommended. A functional resume focuses on skills, which makes it ideal for those who lack experience or who have gaps in their employment history.
  • Combination Resume – Have previous experience in the customer service industry? Then you may want to use this format. Specifically, the format combines both “Functional” and “Reverse-Chronological”.

Use a Customer Service Resume Template

Right, time to fire-up your text editor and get typing!

But wait there.

Although great for creating simple files, there are better alternatives when creating a customer service resume. 

You see, text editors don’t hold its structure, which can result in layout breakages.

Want to avoid an afternoon of headache? Use a customer service resume template. You can tailor any of the following resume templates for a customer service specialist resume.

What to Include in a Customer Service Resume

The main sections in a customer service resume are:

  • Work Experience
  • Contact Information
  • Skills
  • Education

To really make an impression, you can also add these optional sections:

So those are the customer service resume sections, but what do you write for each of them? 

Let’s find out!

Want to know more about the different sections? View our guide on What to Put on a Resume.

How to Correctly Display your Contact Information

You should treat your contact section with the same care that you treat your customers.

Failure to do so could result in misspellings and wrong numbers, which makes it impossible for the recruiter to offer you an interview! 

The contact information section on your resume must include:

  • Full Name
  • Professional Title – Align this to the role you’re applying for, so “Customer Service Assistant”
  • Phone Number – Check each number carefully 
  • Email Address – Keep your email professional (firstname.lastname@gmail.com), unlike that one from your childhood (hannalovescheese@gmail.com).
  • Location – City+Country
  • Optional - relevant social media

Correct Example:

  • Joe Blogs - Customer Service Assistant. 101-358-6095. joeblogs@gmail.com

Incorrect Example:

  • Joe Blogs - Customer Service Hero. 101-358-6095. joeykangaroo123@gmail.com

How to Write a Customer Service Resume Summary or Objective

Establishments are always on the lookout for customer service representatives.

But this fact only makes competition more intense.

And with this in mind, we shouldn’t be surprised that recruiters spend just a few seconds on each resume.

If only there was a way to get the recruiter hooked and read through your whole resume?

Fortunately, you can this with a resume summary or objective.

As a customer service representative, you know that friendly introductions go a long way. Similarly, both resume summaries and objectives are short paragraphs that introduce your skills and experiences. 

But what is the difference between a summary and an objective?

A resume summary is a 2-4 sentence summary of your most notable restaurant experiences and achievements.

Customer Service Resume Summary Example

  • Enthusiastic customer service representative with five years of retail experience responding to all manner of customer inquiries. Career highlights included being awarded “Employee of the Month” for 36 months out of 48 months and receiving 99% positive customer survey results at XYZ Convenience. Seeking a role at ABC Tech, where my service skills can be leveraged to achieve and maintain the highest level of customer service.

A resume objective is a 2-4 sentence snapshot of your goals and aspirations.

Customer Service Resume Objective Example

  • Passionate and hard-working student working towards graduating with a BA in History from UT Austin. Relevant experience includes serving customers in a campus bar. Eager to become the new customer service representative role at XYZ Tech to leverage interpersonal skills for the highest quality of service.

Got relevant work experience? Use a resume summary. 

Got the skills, but can’t back it up with experience? Use a resume objective.  

Simple!

How to Make Your Customer Service Work Experience Stand Out

Recruiters hate nothing more than risk.

You see, their job is on the line if they hire the wrong person.

As such, you need to prove you have what it takes, and your work experience section is the easiest way to do that

Here’s the best way for customer service representatives to structure the work experience section:

  • Position name
  • Company Name
  • Dates
  • Responsibilities & Achievements

Example:

Customer Service Representative 

YXZ Convenience Store

03/2017 - 04/2021

  • Achieved highest up-sell rates in both 2017 (2.8%) and 2019 (3.2%)
  • Worked at the customer information desk for 10+ hour shifts
  • Welcomed 1000+ customers during store opening event
  • Won “Employee of the Month” three months in a row by engaging with customers in personal, yet professional manner

The key here is to showcase how valuable you were to your previous employer. Doing so will have companies competing against each other for your skills.

Instead of saying…

“Spoke to all customers”

Say:

“Won “Employee of the Month” three months in a row by engaging with customers in personal, yet professional manner”

Simply put, the first sentence states that you spoke with customers, but it doesn’t say whether you were successful in doing so.  

The second statement goes into more detail and backs-up your claims with awards.

What if You Don’t Have Any Work Experience?

Maybe you’re a student looking for their first customer service job?

Or maybe, you have experience in the field, but never in a retail environment?

Don’t worry, as there are ways to get around this.

All you need are the core job skills and a willingness to learn.

And you can showcase this with related job experience or school projects. 

For example, if you’ve ever worked as a cashier, you can talk about any crossover skills and experiences. Just like a customer service representative, you were friendly, dealt with customers concerns, and operated a POS/computer. 

Use Action Words to Make Your Customer Service Resume POP!

Let’s image that you’re a job recruiter.

Sitting down to read the same generic resumes, one after another.

No one stands out. In fact, all resumes are blending into one.

This exercise highlights the importance of making your resume different from the other applicants. 

One of the best ways to do this is to use power words:

  • Solved
  • Determined
  • Formulated
  • Identified
  • Clarified
  • Initiated
  • Proved

How to Correctly List your Education

After showcasing your experiences, you should delve into your education to date. 

There’s no magic tricks with this section, just enter your education history in this format:

  • Degree Type & Major
  • University/School Name
  • Years Studied
  • GPA, Honours, Courses, and anything else you might want to add

Example:

High School Diploma

Lynbrook High School, California

Graduated 2018

Still concerned about your education section?

The answers below may help you:

What if I haven’t finished my current education yet?

  • No problem. Just mention your education to date

Should I include my high school education?

  • It’s recommended to only include your highest form of education. If that’s your high school diploma, then list it

What do I put first, my education or experience?

  • For a bartender role, your experiences always come first 

Need more advice? Check out our guide on how to list education on a resume.

Top 10 Skills for a Customer Service Resume

Whether you’re skilled enough to multi-task while on the phone or operate POS systems with ease, the recruiter is waiting to find out. 

However… to keep your resume to one page, you can’t list every skill you own.

So, which skills don’t make the cut?

It comes down to looking at the job description to identify what the company wants from their new customer service representative. 

Will the specific skill be beneficial to the company?

If so, list it!

For some inspiration, here are some of the best customer service resume skills:

Hard Skills for Customer Service Professionals:

  • Accuracy
  • Computer Skills
  • Mathematical Skills
  • Product Knowledge
  • Point of Sale (POS) Systems

Soft Skills for Customer Service Professionals:

  • Personable and friendly 
  • Endurance (long hours)
  • Conflict resolution 
  • Time management 
  • Team player

Pro Tip:

  • The hiring manager will typically ask interviewees for examples of when they have shown the skill listed. As such, only include skills that you actually posses.

Here’s a more comprehensive list of 100+ must-have skills this year.

What Else Can You Include?

Ask yourself one question..

Is your resume the BEST it can be?

Although we have completed every essential resume section, we have to do everything it takes to win that interview.

Adding the following sections could be the deciding factor in whether you’re interviewed for the customer service representative role or not.

Awards & Certifications

Have you ever won an employee of the year (or month) award?

Have you completed any additional courses to expand your knowledge?

Whether it’s an award or certification, make space for this section if you have something that you’re proud of.

Here are some quick example:

  • Employee of the Year 2019 – XYZ Convenience 
  • Learning How to Learn – Coursera Certificate

Languages

Applying to an establishment in China Town?

Then being fluent in Mandarin is a good way to shortcut your resume to the top of the pile.

Whether the job description requires it or not, being able to speak multiple languages is impressive – and no one can argue with that!

Rank the languages by proficiency:

  • Native
  • Fluent
  • Proficient
  • Intermediate
  • Basic

Interests & Hobbies

Now, you may be wondering, “how does my love of animals affect my customer service skills?”

Well, it doesn’t.

But employers want customer service representatives who will fit in with the rest of the staff.

Your hobbies allow the hiring manager to see behind your qualifications and learn more about who you REALLY are.

Here’s which hobbies & interests you may want to mention.

Include a Cover Letter with Your Resume

As a customer service representative, you need to leave a positive impression.

Your application is no different.

And the best way to leave an unforgettable impression is to write a convincing cover letter.

You see, resumes give the vital information, but nothing speaks to a recruiter like a cover letter that delves deeper into who you are and why you want the job.

Here’s how to create a structure that works.

cover letter structure customer service

You should complete the following sections:

Personal Contact Information

Include your full name, profession, phone number, email, and address 

Hiring Manager’s Contact Information

Include their full name, position, location, email

Opening Paragraph

To hook the hiring manager, the start of your resume needs to pack a punch. Use concise language to mention:

  • The position you’re applying for
  • Your experience summary and best achievement to date

The Body

Once you’ve sparked the hiring manager’s interest, you can delve further into the following specifics:

  • Why you chose this specific establishment 
  • What you know about the establishment’s culture 
  • How your skills will be beneficial to the establishment
  • If you have worked in similar industries or positions before

Closing Paragraph

Avoid ending the conversation abruptly, you should:

  • Conclude the main points of your letter 
  • Thank the hiring manager for their time and the opportunity
  • End with a call to action. This is a good way to continue the conversation further. A simple “At your earliest opportunity, I’d love to discuss more about how I can help XYZ with...” will work.

Formal Salutations

Although this letter shows your personal side, the letter should end professionally. Use something like, “Kind regards” or “Sincerely.”

For extra advice and inspiration, read our step-by-step guide on how to write a cover letter.

Key Takeaways

You know your customer service skills are good enough to get the job.

And if you follow the above advice, the recruiter will know that too!

Let’s conclude what we’ve learnt:

  • The resume format needs to suit your specific situation. Prioritize the reverse-chronological format, and then follow the content layout tips
  • Use an attention-grabbing resume summary or objective 
  • In your work experience section, show your value by highlighting your most relevant and best achievements, rather than day-to-day duties
  • Attach a convincing cover letter for a personable application

That was a lot of information, but now you’re all set to make a Customer Service resume of your own!

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